TripSafely has been a huge success at our School.

Nicky Timms - Ashford School

Frequently asked questions

Q. How do I change my login password?
Q. Do teachers running educational visits need qualifications or safety training?
Q. Does the HSE enforce legislation for overseas trips?
Q. Who has legal responsibility for school trips and can this be delegated?
Q. Who enforces legislation for school trips?
Q. What is the relevant legislation in relation to school trips?


Q. How do I change my login password?
A. The first thing you may want to do is change your password.
To do this, click the grey bar labelled 'Change your password'.
You will need to enter or copy & paste your existing password into the first field and then enter your new password into the next 2 fields, the new password must be at least 6 characters long and can contain numbers and letters.
If you make a mistake, a message will appear in the top green bar, click update when you're done.

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Q. Do teachers running educational visits need qualifications or safety training?
A. Employers must be satisfied that their teachers and staff are competent to lead or supervise a visit. It is a legal requirement that leaders are competent for the activities they are leading. On adventurous activities, leaders with specialist skills and qualifications will be needed for the activity elements of the trip. Teachers will generally be in charge at other times.

For more information please visit the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/services/education/faqs.htm#school-trips

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Q. Does the HSE enforce legislation for overseas trips?
A. The duties in the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and the regulations made under it apply to activities taking place on or off school premises (including school visits) in Great Britain.
Any incident occurring overseas is outside HSE's jurisdiction and HSE will not investigate or take action in relation to the actual circumstances of the incident itself. Whether criminal charges should arise from such incidents would be a matter for the relevant national authorities to consider and pursue. Some countries may allow parents and other parties to institute civil actions or private prosecutions following death or injury.
HSE can, however, consider any circumstances relating to activities carried out in Great Britain to support a particular visit which may reveal systemic failings in the management of school trips. This could include general management arrangements, i.e. risk assessments for the activities, training and competence of staff, co-operation and co-ordination with other parties.

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Q. Who has legal responsibility for school trips and can this be delegated?
A. The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 places overall responsibility for health and safety with the employer. In many cases, the employer will be the local authority; in other cases, it will be the governing body or proprietor of the school. The employer has the overall legal responsibility and accountability for the health, safety and welfare for the school staff, and for the health and safety of pupils, visitors and volunteers.
Health and safety functions (but not accountability) can be delegated to members of staff within the school to fulfil health and safety responsibilities on behalf of the employer.
Teachers organising and taking part in school visits off-site accept responsibility for the care and welfare of pupils, and they act in loco parentis. They will also have duties as employees and/or managers under health and safety at work legislation.

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Q. Who enforces legislation for school trips?
A. Some educational visits in Great Britain will be to premises licensed under the Adventure Activities Licensing Regulations 2004. IN broad terms, HSE is the enforcing authority for sites run by educational providers, including all centres run by local authorities. Many local authorities have their own centres, although these may be some distance from the local authority itself. Local authorities will be the enforcing authority for the remaining providers, including commercial providers such as multi-activity holiday centres.

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Q. What is the relevant legislation in relation to school trips?
A. The key legislation is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. The Act requires employers to ensure the health and safety of their employees and non-employees, so far as is reasonably practicable. The Act also places duties on individuals to take care for the health and safety of themselves and others.
The Act is supplemented by regulations which make the general requirements more explicit.
Key regulations are:
• The Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999, which require employers to undertake risk assessments and put measures in place to control the significant risks;
• The Adventure Activities Licensing Regulations 2004, which require certain providers of facilities for adventure activities to be licensed.

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